Training

 

When should I use a fire extinguisher? 

Portable extinguishers are not designed to fight large or spreading fires. Even against small fires, they are useful only under certain conditions:



  • The operator must know how to use the extinguisher.
  • The extinguisher must be within easy reach, in working order, and fully charged.
  • The operator must have a clear escape route that will not be blocked by fire.
  • The extinguisher must match the type of fire being fought. (Extinguishers containing water are unsuitable for use on grease or electrical fires.)
  • The extinguisher must be large enough to put out the fire. Many portable extinguishers discharge completely in as few as eight to ten seconds.
  • Always be sure the fire department inspects the fire site, even if you think you've extinguished the fire.

We offer training and presentations on fire safety and protection. Please contact us for availability. 972-291-3495 or email

Training@bestfireprotectionservice.com

What are the four classes of fire?     



There are four classes of fires. All fire extinguishers are labeled, using standard symbols, for the classes of fires on which they can be used. A red slash through any of the symbols tells you the extinguisher cannot be used on that class of fire. A missing symbol tells you only that the extinguisher has not been tested for a given class of fire, but may be used if an extinguisher labeled for that class of fire is not available.


Types of Fires:

  • CLASS A: Ordinary combustibles such as wood, cloth, and paper.
  • CLASS B: Flammable liquids such as gasoline, oil, and oil-based paint.
  • CLASS C: Energized electrical equipment, including wiring, fuse boxes, circuit breakers, machinery and appliances.
  • CLASS D: Combustible metals such as magnesium or sodium.

When should I fight a fire?     



  • If the fire is small and contained. The time to use a fire extinguisher is in the early, or incipient, stage of a fire. Once the fire starts to grow or spread, it is best to evacuate the building, closing doors or windows behind you.
  • If you are safe from toxic smoke. If the fire is producing large amounts of thick, black smoke or chemical smoke, it may be best not to try to extinguish the fire. Neither, should you attempt to extinguish the fire in a confined space. Outdoors, approach the fire with the wind at your back. Remember that all fires will produce carbon monoxide and many fires will produce toxic gases that can be fatal, even in small amounts.
  • If you have a means of escape. You should always fight a fire with an exit or other means of escape at your back. If the fire is not quickly extinguished, you need to be able to get out quickly and avoid becoming trapped.
  • If your instincts tell you it's OK. If you do not feel comfortable attempting to extinguish the fire, don't try - get out and let the fire department do their job.